Marketing Director Wanted!

Yes-to-OpportunityThis is a deviation from my normal posts.  In the past, some of you have inquired about working at Intertech.  This position reports to the Intertech Partner in charge of training sales but has “dotted line” reporting to me.  If you have interest or know someone who may, please apply at Intertech’s website (http://www.Intertech.com/Jobs).  We’re looking for candidates in Minneapolis/St. Paul.  Below is the copy from the job posting on our site.

Intertech, an award-winning firm named the #1 mid-sized employer in Minnesota by Minnesota Business magazine in 2012 and eight-time winner of the Business Journal’s Best Places to Work competition, is looking for an exceptional Marketing Director.

This role will continue the drive in Intertech’s growth (Intertech is an eight time Inc. 500/5000 winner).

As a Marketing Director, we’re looking for someone who can provide direction to the leadership team yet organize and implement the day-to-day marketing activities.  We’re looking for an extraordinary individual who can:

  • Provide a yearly marketing plan with execution details
  • Manage activities and events like our newsletters, user group, and conference exhibiting
  • Engage our customers on social media
  • Create phenomenal content
  • Work with our outside marketing design firm on branding
  • Work with our outside retained public relations firm

Additional Skillsets Needed:

  • The ability to get the big picture and get things done
  • Past marketing experience
  • An undergraduate degree in marketing, business, or English is preferred
  • Excellent writing skills
  • Solid organization skills

Why Join Intertech?

There are many reasons Intertech is the employer of choice.  Below are just a few:

  • The ability as the Marketing Director to have an important voice and visible role in our firm
  • Flexible schedule including standing work-from-home day(s)
  • A remarkable environment. We’re the recipient of over 35 awards for work environment and growth
  • A three month paid sabbatical for every seven years of service

All the other stuff needed to be recognized as the #1 mid-sized employer in Minnesota… good pay, comprehensive benefits, …

Not every bat is a hit

Trying new stuff is part of the fun of running a business. During the past ten years or so we’ve tried five new business ideas: one was a flat out failure, one is slightly better than a financial wash and three have worked quite well. (That’s a pretty good success rate considering the old baseball adage: you must bat 10 times to get three hits!) And while the wins are the most fun and profitable, I don’t regret the things we tried that didn’t work out either. As my father used to tell me, “If you do nothing, you’ll make no mistakes.”

The failed venture involved licensing a specific software application we developed. Similar to the findings described in the new book Just Start: Take Action, Embrace Uncertainty, Create the Future, our new venture was a modest undertaking. It involved only myself and one employee and a limited test with one client. When it didn’t work as planned due to technology limitations, we simply abandoned the effort with very little lost revenue.

Determined to continue exploring new revenue streams, however, we decided to try selling our courseware directly to other training firms. As the authors of Just Start report, successful serial entrepreneurs “use the means at hand” when embarking on a new venture. That was the principle at work in this example from Intertech. Our investment in developing software training courseware is already built into our business model since that is what we use in our existing classroom and virtual training classes.

We also employed another Just Start principle: “stay within your acceptable loss.” To sell our courseware directly we used Yahoo (www.intertechcourseware.com) to create a storefront, which limited our upfront investment.

And we’re also embracing the final Just Start adage to “manage expectations.” While relatively small given our overall sales, we are doing better than just breaking even. Not bad for a venture with little upfront cost or risk!

Next post:  Winning big by starting small.

Social Media in Business

10 tips on the web and social media.  This was done for a friend who has a paint business with dealer reps: